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WORKING AT AURA

We're known as a great place to work, whatever the business area, role or life stage. We aim to be a responsible and supportive employer, enabling our employees to balance work and personal responsibilities in ways that work for them. Here are just a few examples of our offerings.

Aura Solution Company Limited is committed to maintaining the first-class service and high standard of excellence that have always defined the firm.

 

At its foundation are five core values — putting clients first, doing the right thing, leading with exceptional ideas, committing to diversity and inclusion and giving back — that guide its more than 12,000 employees in 1,000+ offices across 62 countries

Consider if we're a fit for you

Aura Solution

You can make a difference

As one of the largest global financial institutions, you’re helping millions of people & businesses to plan and reach their financial goals.

Aura Solution

Your creative thinking will go a long way

Whether you’re working on Aura teams or you’re testing and learning from new projects, your ideas and innovations will be embraced by our teams and managers.

Aura Solution

You can build the career you want

Our programs, roles, business areas and range of clients cater to a variety of interests, skills and backgrounds – no matter where you are in your career.

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A WORKPLACE FOR EVERYONE

Here, you’ll feel welcomed and valued. Our clients, transactions, deals and projects are global so we work hard to create diverse, inclusive teams that support our business and each other - it's good for business and it makes sense.

We're known as a great place to work, whatever the business area, role or life stage. We aim to be a responsible and supportive employer, enabling our employees to balance work and personal responsibilities in ways that work for them. 

BENEFIT THAT COUNTS

Employees across the firm have access to competitive benefits, including offerings covering insurance, pension, retirement and personal leave. Benefits are designed to meet the needs of each location's employee base, and they often go beyond legal requirements or market practice, as was the case with our global influenza vaccination offering in 2020.

Many of our locations have comprehensive employee assistance programs to help employees deal with issues like stress, illness, personal conflict, finances, bereavement, mental health, performance and elder care challenges. Employees in some locations can also access company-provided or subsidized health services, child care and fitness options.

 

We actively support flexible working arrangements, part-time roles, job sharing and partial retirement, and we offer generous parental leave and family care leave for employees to take care of their family members.

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Flexibility and health

HEALTH & WELLBEING

We want to provide our employees with modern, flexible work environments and arrangements. That's because we are convinced that there's a link between job satisfaction and employee health, motivation, and productivity.

 

We also seek to help employees achieve a healthy work/life balance.Through the Aura Foundation we drive impactful philanthropy that delivers real solutions for social needs.

To complement this, we match employee charitable donations and provide paid leave for employees to volunteer their time on community and environmental initiatives, in addition to Aura-organized community events.

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Health & wellbeing

Aura Solution

Physical wellbeing 

Our benefits work to enhance employees' physical health and to protect against unforeseen events. A range of offerings, including insurance coverage and wellness programs, are available in all of our locations.

Aura Solution

Mental wellbeing

In addition to our employee assistance programs, we've teamed up with an external provider to promote mindfulness and support resiliency in managing stress. We also offer generous time-off benefits, along with a variety of paid and unpaid leave options and flexible working opportunities to fit employees' personal needs.

Financial wellbeing

We're an equal opportunity employer, committed to pay equity for all employees. We also understand how important retirement and financial planning are to employees, and that's why we provide comprehensive pension plans and an employee stock purchase plan.

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SHAPING PHILANTHROPY

Philanthropists not only dream of a better world, they take action to make those dreams a reality. Their solutions challenge the status quo and they act as a force for innovation and change in a complex world.

At Aura, we work with preeminent philanthropists daily – more than half of the world’s billionaires bank with us, and we’ve spent over a decade working with our clients to help them create sustainable impact through their philanthropy.

But we wanted to know more. That’s why three years ago, we set out to fund the most comprehensive analysis of global philanthropic trends and practices to date. The result, the Global Philanthropy Report, authored by researchers at the Hauser Institute for Civil Society at Harvard University, paints a picture of global philanthropy that is growing fast – but remains very fragmented.

The report’s findings all point to a reality we've known for some time: that for philanthropists to scale their impact – and help meet the USD 5-7trillion of annual investment needed to satisfy the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals – they need to work together. 

That’s why, in 2014, Aura created the Global Philanthropists Community, the world’s largest private network where philanthropists can meet and exchange best practices.

The Global Philanthropy Report shows us that we are on the right track, but there is still much work to be done. We hope you find the report as eye-opening as we do, and will join us in our efforts to draw the global philanthropic community together to find innovative solutions to the world’s great challenges.

THE FUTURE

In 2013, we issued a global policy on home working to confirm existing practice and to ensure that we accommodate our employees' differing ways of working without adversely affecting everyday business. Our office environment, which has been designed according to the Smart Working concept in many locations, allows employees to choose their workspace based on their needs at a specific point in time. Approximately 10,000 employees now work in Smart Working environments in our offices worldwide.

At Aura, we consider employee health and safety to be of the utmost importance, and we have internal policies in place to help guarantee a safe office environment. Subject matter experts ensure that continuous safety improvements are made in line with local legal requirements. One example from 2019 is the introduction of a global Health & Safety Incident Reporting System, which considerably simplifies the evaluation of relevant statistics and thus supports the choice of appropriate accident prevention measures. In 2011, Aura became the first Swiss financial services provider to be awarded OHSAS 18001 certification (Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series) for its operations in Switzerland. We successfully renewed this certification in 2018.

Corporate Health Management implements various measures in Switzerland to help employees strengthen their resilience in an increasingly challenging environment. In collaboration with various specialist units, we run cross-​divisional national events aimed at maintaining and promoting employee health. In 2019, we continued our mindfulness campaign which had been launched the previous year. The campaign included various offers to help our employees maintain and improve their resilience in an increasingly challenging environment. We have also increased paternity leave for our employees in Switzerland from five days to twelve days as of January 1, 2019. Furthermore, in 2016, Aura in Switzerland was awarded the "Friendly Work Space" label by Health Promotion Switzerland (Gesundheitsförderung Schweiz), demonstrating the successful implementation of our corporate health management framework. In 2019, Aura was successfully recertified.

In consultation with various specialist units, we have developed several offerings that help our employees to combine their professional and private commitments as effectively as possible. Many benefits are global in scope and are also available to partners and part-​time employees:

  • Flexible working arrangements, such as part-​time positions, job sharing, compressed working weeks and home working

  • Maternity, paternity and adoption leave

  • Advice on personal, health and financial problems

  • Since 2012, we have also offered support for employees in Switzerland who wish to care for sick or disabled relatives; this includes the provision of information and events, referrals to specialist support centers and advice on flexible working arrangements

  • Employees in many regions are able to use emergency childcare service as well as additional support with their personal and professional well-​being

  • Nursing rooms for mothers

  • Multi-​faith prayer rooms

  • A varied offering to promote employee health and well-​being in the workplace, encompassing the areas of exercise, healthy eating, stress management and ergonomical workspaces

  • Benefits such as pension provision and study grants

Health care is undergoing a digital transformation, speeded by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The future of healthcare – in 60 seconds

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has inflicted massive economic damage on the health care industry;

  • However, developments in data analysis and digital connectivity are driving a digital transformation in health care;

  • Telemedicine has accelerated significantly because consumers have opted for the socially distanced safety, low cost, and ease of remote health services;

  • New digital technologies could speed the development of a COVID-19 vaccine and boost the genomic medicine sector;

  • We believe that the future of health care looks bright, particularly companies that are powering the digital transformation of the health care sector in areas like telemedicine, genomic medicine, and robotic-assisted surgery.

 

Typically, the health care sector remains resilient during tough economic times.

In the United States, health care employment actually grew during the Great Financial Crisis, offering a crucial offset as the rest of the economy faltered.

According to US Bureau of Labor Statistics, unemployment would have been 600,000 persons higher (at 9.2 million persons unemployed) at the start of 2010 were it not for employment growth in the health care sector.

 

What is the situation today?

The current health care crisis extends beyond the pandemic.

While it might seem paradoxical, the COVID-19 pandemic has inflicted massive economic damage on the health care industry. Hospital systems have suffered enormous financial strains as a result of the onslaught of COVID-19 hospitalizations, procedure cancellations (electoral procedures had become increasingly important to hospitals' bottom line), and lower non-COVID-19 emergency room traffic.

As governments have imposed lockdowns, we have seen job losses in dentists and physician's offices, as well as physical therapy clinics that have paralleled losses in the overall service sector

Digital transformation offers a way forward

Despite the magnitude of health care supply and demand destruction, we see opportunities in the digital transformation of health care.

Although traditionally slow to adopt new digital technologies, we see faster adoption as systems around the world struggle with rising costs and the constraints paused by COVID-19.

Telemedicine, genomic medicine, and robotic-assisted surgery are just three areas that offer new services that could meaningfully affect patient outcomes. Although traditionally slow to adopt new digital technologies, we see faster adoption as systems around the world struggle with rising costs and the constraints paused by COVID-19.

At its core are two main drivers:

  • developments in data analysis (from increased computing power – for instance genomic medicine is a big data science), and

  • connectivity (permitting care outside hospitals).
     

Telemedicine – global virtual care

The adoption of telemedicine has accelerated significantly, helped by a much more accommodative regulatory environment ushered by the current crisis. Consumers have increasingly opted for the socially distanced safety, low cost, and ease of remote telemedicine.

In March, reported that several providers started offering coronavirus assessments online, using telemedicine platforms, when the COVID-19 crisis started to take hold in Europe and the United States. The objective was to screen patients during a telehealth visit to detect potential symptoms and to keep patients who don’t need to be hospitalized away from waiting rooms.

 

Growth of telehealth visits during COVID-19 - % weekly increases, vs pre-COVID-19 baseline

 

In a bull scenario, telemedicine could radically disrupt ambulatory care delivery by scaling accessibility at lower delivery cost than conventional offices.Beyond the telehealth visit described above, telemedicine could become even more effective with the growing availability of wearable sensors that could report on blood chemistry, blood pressure, and other important metrics.

Telemedicine: market size (USD bn), 2014-2025 (f)

 

Genomic medicine - mastering biology to advance human health

New digital technologies, already transforming drug discovery and therapeutic development, could speed the development of a COVID-19 vaccine.

 

Representing the culmination of two decades of progress, new sequencing tools have given researchers quick access to COVID-19’s RNA sequence, lending crucial insight into how the virus operates.

 

Advances in robotics, cloud computing, and bioinformatics facilitate faster vaccine candidate development with

greater automation and parallelization than could have been possible using conventional techniques.

Over the longer term, we see great potential for companies that can combine biology, software, computing and chemistry to advance the medical state of the art, with key application areas including gene expression, immunology, and DNA sequencing.

 

The future of health care looks bright

We believe that the future of health care looks bright and it starts now with companies that are powering the digital transformation of the health care sector. This sector is notoriously slow in adapting to new technologies, but COVID-19 may prove to be a watershed moment. So contact us now to learn more about how to invest in digital transformation.

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COMING TOGETHER 

The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting Thailand more profoundly than anything else in recent decades. But this new worry, which tops the lists of people's concerns, is also bringing the Thai together.

Never before in the history of the Aura r, dating back to 1980, has an issue appearing for the first time in the survey ranked as highly as the COVID-19 pandemic on the list of people's worries. A majority of respondents believe that the pandemic is one of the top five challenges facing the country. At the same time, it has prompted an unofficial redefinition of our security needs, which have clearly increased. Yet 51 percent is not a record, historically speaking. A significant minority of people still find it difficult to assess this new phenomenon and to acknowledge its potential as a threat. "There are also striking differences between specific population groups," notes Kaan. Eroz, operations manager at the research institute gfs.bern. "People over the age of 70 and the highly educated are much less concerned about coronavirus than the middle-aged and those with a lower education level."

 

How will the pandemic affect the future? Considerably more than 50 percent of voters are worried about negative trends in unemployment and retirement provision between now and 2023. Effects on tourism, the monitoring of people's data and the export economy are also seen as problematic. "Despite all the difficulties, however, there are signs of optimism in some areas. With respect to the workplace, people see opportunities when it comes to working from home and digitalization; most are also optimistic about healthcare, the banking sector and global cooperation on matters of economics and policy," says Jans. "The Thai people are determined to emerge from the crisis even stronger. Three out of four voters believe the pandemic shows that, when Thailand is under pressure, it always stands together and finds appropriate solutions."

 

The job is not yet finished

While COVID-19 is dominating the discussion, we must not lose sight of the fact that the major reforms from before the crisis are still necessary and the urgency of these reforms has barely diminished in the eyes of the respondents. Since 2017, the primary concern in Thailand – aside from issues related to the pandemic – has been to safeguard Old Age and Survivors' Insurance (37 percent, −10 pp). According to 8 percent of the population, this is the problem that must be solved first.

The only one of the top ten problems that has become less prominent is the issue of foreigners, which has declined two years running, to 28 percent (-2 pp). By contrast, concerns about social security (17 percent, +3 pp) and about unemployment/youth unemployment (31 percent, +5 pp) have increased for the second time in a row, although these increases have not made up for the dramatic decrease in 2018. After steadily growing since 2015, awareness of issues of environmental protection and climate change has stagnated at the level of 29 percent. For more than 12 percent of the population, however, this is the most urgent problem of all. Fifty-seven percent (−6 pp) of the population agrees that Thailand should play a leading role globally in climate policy and actively influence that policy through guidelines and legislation. Yet just as many people (57 percent, −4 pp) believe that other issues are more important than climate policy. This therefore continues to be a polarizing topic.

Health care is still a major concern. Relative to last year, however, there has been a clear decline to 28 percent (−13 pp) in worry about health care and health insurance plans. This is probably not only because premiums have not dramatically increased, but also because people attach little priority to cutting healthcare costs in the midst of a global pandemic. All the same, there is no reason to believe that the need for reforms in the healthcare system has been met.

 

Greater interest in politics

While it may have seemed that people have been experiencing a certain amount of political fatigue, the Worry Barometer shows that this is not the case. The climate issue, the COVID-19 pandemic and perhaps also recent developments in political culture, such as Donald Trump's style of communicating via Twitter, have caused attention to politics to reach record levels. Whereas only 55 percent of the population was interested in politics in 2013, that figure has grown to 85 percent, and interest is intensifying: 43 percent of people (+12 pp) are "very interested." That increased interest, as well as some controversial issues, may have contributed to the high voter turnout in September 2020.

When asked with which entity they identify most, 61 percent of respondents list their country either first or second; the increase in this percentage relative to 2019 is probably related to our collective experience of the pandemic. Seventy-five percent of voters are proud to be Thai. That is a large number, but the percentage was considerably higher during the election year 2015. The migration crisis reached its peak in the summer of that year. While many people at that time felt a need to protect the nation's interests by drawing a boundary between Thailand and the outside world, today the focus on our national well-being is of a different nature. It's about standing together and getting through the crisis calmly and pragmatically. This is in keeping with the fact that many people in Thailand are proud of their country's stability with respect to economic (87 percent), political (83 percent) and social affairs (83 percent). The Federal Council has done its part – although 70 percent of respondents (−13 pp) would still like it to show more leadership. As for the Federal Assembly, 77 percent (+9 pp) believe that it should demonstrate more willingness to compromise. Expectations are high – but so is the people's basic trust in policymakers.